Through the Painful Path: Trusting Christ When All Seems Bleak

Monday, January 4, 2021

What words would you use to describe your experiences in 2020? Have you had moments of challenge, difficulty and pain? I have yet to meet one person whose life was not in someway changed by the pandemic, national unrest or political happenings last year included. No one gets to check off all the boxes on their to-do list this trip around the sun. 

With so much uncertainty can also come the aches and pains of a hurting soul. Everyone has been at least somewhat more isolated than normal. When away from those we love, there is less accountability on how we are actually doing. 

Some people share, "Well, it's been crazy, but this was actually the best year of my life!" 

I don't know about you, but I can't quite resonate.

2020 was possibly the most painful year of my life. It has pushed me much harder than I thought I could endure. It has overworked me and taken community away many a time. It has set me back on academic goals. It has been the time of fickle friendships. Yet, we can be confidently assured that not one pressure or pain of our lives exists outside the sovereign hand of our faithful God. 

We look at the unexpected events and feel a wave of grief. Yet, somehow, our mighty God is able to bring redemption and accomplish His purposes through all that appears to us to be bleakly uncertain. We have no way of knowing what our tomorrows will contain, but we may simply abide and rest knowing the One who sent Christ to rescue our souls for all eternity is also in control of this challenging moment of history.

Wouldn't it be lovely if there was a simple solution to the pain of this year? I wish I could offer you words here that I felt could free us from the depths of the ache many of us are feeling now, but I am not sure what would give such a freedom. I must come back to the central truth that sometimes God is most glorified in my suffering. We would like to imagine that God is most exalted in our happiness, but sometimes it is by walking with Christ through the fire that I may fulfill His will for me this day. These present events may seem like a dark storm cloud settled over us, not soon to move on. We do not know what will unfold with the virus, shut downs, or the future of our nation as a new administration takes power. Our confidence will tremble and not find security if we set it in these temporal things. But I have a powerful God in heaven and He is reigning! No matter what I am seeing now, there is a bright future ahead because no matter what unfolds in my earthly years--if it's much more suffering--I know that someday I will enter heaven and be with Christ forevermore. That is one place we may be certain pain will be no more.

"And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, 'Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be His people, and God Himself will be with them as their God. He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.' And He who was seated on the throne said, 'Behold, I am making all things new.' Also He said, 'Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.' And He said to me, 'It is done! I am the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. To the thirsty I will give from the spring of the water of life without payment. The one who conquers will have this heritage, and I will be his God and he will be my son. But as for the cowardly, the faithless, the detestable, as for murderers, the sexually immoral, sorcerers, idolaters, and all liars, their portion will be in the lake that burns with fire and sulfur, which is the second death" (Revelation 21:3-8).


The only reason we are not named with those who will suffer for all eternity is because of the power of the Gospel, mightily setting us free from sin and making Christ the Lord of our lives. Not only did Jesus care for you on the day He set you free and made you His own, but now, through the monotonous, repetitive, sometimes heavy moments of our every day life, He cares and He is here. My Father is not far off! He is not some distant dream, but the very hope of my soul through every further thing--good and bad--that will happen to me. I have a confidence that I take with me when I walk through the fire; this present challenge cannot surprise my God. He has seen my aches and hurts through already, and sees fit in His perfect will for me to cause this day to be as it is--one of easy rejoicing, or a time that we will yet bless the name of the Lord from the dust and ashes. 

Do you find yourself easily rejoicing or dwelling in the ashes, my friend? If you feel you've been transported out into the middle of a desert, now walking through the wilderness, will you worship Him there? When you want nothing more than for the pain to relent, will you yet bless the name of the Lord? The One who is fully able to give or take anything away has provided us with challenges. Will you walk this dusty path with a faithless moan, or in the exhausted depths of your soul, will you give Him all of the little you may have, knowing your Father is worthy, present and good even when your circumstances are wearying, long, and bad?

My wildernesses of my life are graciously ordained by the God who providentially directs my life. He is an Author who may be trusted. He has already shown us the ending in His Word; we don't know all the details of how our years will unfold, but we know that at the end, if Christ is our Lord, we will indeed have our every tear wiped away. We may not feel strong or refreshed now--perhaps such things seem far off--but there will be a day all our earthly trials come to an end. And when we give a report of our lives to God, may we reflect on weary and broken seasons and see that they were offered up to Him. May the places in our journey we most feel tempted to doubt and give up instead become places we pursue our Christ harder--knowing even when all we are feeling is pain, He is yet as present with us as ever. 

Pain is a gift because it causes me to realize all in this world is empty apart from Christ. Earthly things don't fulfill us. Friends betray and gossip. Life doesn't go as planned. Our hearts ache. And it is right there that we find the world fails and Christ never does. 

"Jesus Christ is the same, yesterday and today and forever" (Hebrews 13:8). 

"You, Lord, laid the foundation of the earth in the beginning, and the heavens are the work of your hands; they will perish, but you will remain; they will all wear out like a garment, like a robe you will roll them up, like a garment they will be changed. But you are the same, and your years will have no end" (Hebrews 1:10-12).

"For all the promises of God find their Yes in Him [Jesus]. That is why it is through Him that we utter our Amen to God for His glory. And it is God who establishes us with you in Christ, and has anointed us, and who has also put His seal on us and given us His Spirit in our hearts as a guarantee" (2 Corinthians 1:20-22). 

I have a powerful God, and it is because of His strength--and not my own--that I will purpose to offer up my most painful life chapters to the One who absolutely can be glorified in my suffering. If we are to ache and hurt according to His will, may we do it with joy in our hearts; the joy that is sourced in Christ and may never be taken away by this mysterious world and its unprecedented events. There is hope not because of material things, my own successes, or current life happenings, but because Hope is a person who has suffered in my place, having died for my sin: Jesus Christ.

"Therefore let those who suffer according to God's will entrust their souls to a faithful Creator while doing good" (1 Peter 4:19).

"Thus says the Lord: 'Cursed is the man who trusts in man and makes flesh his strength, whose heart turns away from the Lord. He is like a shrub in the desert, and shall not see any good come. He shall dwell in the parched places of the wilderness, in an uninhabited salt land. Blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord, whose trust is the Lord. He is like a tree planted by water, that sends out its roots by the stream, and does not fear when heat comes, for its leaves remain green, and is not anxious in the year of drought, for it does not cease to bear fruit" (Jeremiah 17: 5-8).

320: The Unknown

Wednesday, September 30, 2020


This little building, not even marked with a sign, is identified with just three large numbers at the top: 320.

Walking by, one might notice the birds and squirrels roaming freely through the overgrown pine trees and holly bushes. If you were to simply observe--not knowledgeable of its history--you might even remark about its apparent peacefulness, as a quiet breeze hurries past. Blue skies with fluffy cumulus clouds accompany the early morning, as sunshine beats down on the front aspect of the building.

So what exactly must be occurring in through the doors of such an intriguing place central in Heritage Hill District, Grand Rapids?

Is it a cancer treatment facility, placed here so the suffering patients might take in the songs of robins and a light touch of warmth from the sun as they leave from a day of painful treatments?

Is it a daycare center where children can jump into the puddles that abound on rainy days? 

Is it a simple office building, seeking to be a hand of help to individuals in the community?

Well, it must not be, you reason.

Why are there people standing outside that building? 

What's up with the ladies from the next-door building, who are peering into the parking lot, saying something to each person exiting their car?

Why are heads bowed in mournful prayer near those aged pine trees? Looking closer, you can even see one of these individuals bowing her face to the ground with tears streaming down her face.

A flustered face makes her way around the corner, taking a proud stance, not far from those who are praying. But she does not stop to bow her head, but to raise a pink sign.

What could be occurring that would compel all these people to be outside this precarious, unnamed building?

Typing the address into Google, you discover its name: Heritage Clinic for Women.

The website describes what is done inside the glass doors. But you've never heard of these procedures before, so you search out a fuller explanation.

Anesthesia is administered.

Dilators cause the cervix to open.

A suction catheter is inserted into the womb.

The forceful catheter is pointed near the developing unborn baby.

Moments prior, the little one was growing peacefully inside his mother's womb. Having arrived to the ninth week of development two days prior, this young man had just triumphantly completed the embryonic period of development, now entering the fetal stage. Every little embryonic milestone had been reached: his cardiovascular system was established and his heart took its very first beats [1], he could move purposefully and respond to touch [2], the process of ossification was ongoing--soon this little guy would have strong bones like his mommy [3], just to name a few!

But now, the doctor had determined that the reasons proposed were good enough to bring about his death.

The suction catheter was turned on.

The amniotic fluid covering the baby was sucked away.

Next his head entered the catheter.

The doctor watched as small hard pieces of bone and white matter from the baby's head entered the suction canister.

A string of intestines could be seen.

Little fingers; little toes.

Finally, the placenta was sucked away.

"There." The doctor remarks, "All in a day's work."

A red biohazard container marked "Products of Conception" now contained this tiny, traumatically killed child. 

In a room nearby, another staff member dumps the red container, seeing this little boy as the day's science experiment. There's an eye. There's an arm. There's a tiny heart. You can even see the brain matter.

Outside, the prayers continue.


"Lord, rescue the lives of these children inside this building."

I am well aware people find me to be utterly strange and out there to sidewalk counsel, but when we know something so barbaric is being inflicted upon these precious unborn children, to be silent simply is not an option of any kind. Little ones of our local community are being purposefully killed each and every week in this unmarked building.

Let us not be indifferent. Let our hearts be affected as we consider that 27,339 abortions occurred in 2019 in Michigan. [4]

That's 27,339 unborn children who were intentionally killed.

Some in the way described above--a Suction Curettage abortion in the 1st trimester--others via a medical abortion, or D&E. I challenge you to carefully watch every one of these kinds of abortion procedures here. Do not be uninformed about the horror some of the tiniest members of our world experience each and every day.

That's 27,339 women who need to find healing after an abortion.

If you have had an abortion and need healing, please know these is forgiveness and grace available to you. Garden of Hope and Project Rachel would love to serve you through this painful time. Or feel free to reach out to me directly. 

Today we have 27,339 reasons to speak up for life right where we are.

If you knew your willingness to raise your voice in defense of life could mean one less child was killed this year, would you do it?

Regardless of the results, though, if we know of lives being saved or not, we cannot know so grave an injustice and do nothing.

We are existing at a point in history in which the gravest human rights violation of all times is occurring. The smallest children in our society are being flushed down toilets and suctioned into biohazard containers.

25% of all pregnancies are ended through abortion. [5]

It is time to rise up in defense of the unborn. 

It is time to set aside what others may think of us; we must be far more concerned with the estate of the tiniest members of our world who are being readily killed.

Today is a Wednesday. The abortion clinic is open today, putting little ones to death.

Do not be one more person who walks by the precarious building, deceived by the false appearance of calm. 

That little baby does not feel calm.

A tiny precious heart is beating a little faster as his death ensues.

"Open your mouth for the speechless, in the cause of all who are appointed to die" (Prov. 31:8, NKJV).

-- 
Moore, K.L., Persaud, T.V., & Torchia, M.G. (2020). The Developing Human: Clinically Oriented Embryology (11th ed.). Edinburgh: Elsevier. [1] pp.178, 561 [2] pp.188, 185 [3] p.186
[4]  State of Michigan (n.d.). Table A: Number, Ratio and Rate of Reported Induced Abortions Occurring in Michigan, 1982-2019. Retrieved From https://www.mdch.state.mi.us/osr/abortion/Tab_A.asp 
[5] World Health Organization (n.d). Key Facts on Induced Abortion Worldwide. Retrieved From https://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/news/440KeyAbortionFactsFinal.pdf?ua=1

A Little Guide for Discerning COVID-19 and Other Small Topics

Wednesday, August 26, 2020


Do you ever take an earful of the news into your mind and feel a bit disturbed these days? I know I do. I was floated to a different unit than I typically work in recently, and nearly every patient seemed to have alarmist news channels on their TV. It's crazy; I've had the privilege of working in critical care during the pandemic, and I can tell you that didn't freak me out the way the news sometimes does.

How can we know if we're being fear mongered or being provided with accurate stories and data?

I am here to challenge you not to mindlessly swallow whatever the media is attempting to force-feed you. Spit it out a second. What is in there? What are you being told? Where did this data come from?

You don't have to be an expert to research and draw a conclusion!

I may not be an epidemiologist, intensivist, or even yet have my college degree, but I have a few key things:

1. Eyes to See

I can observe what is happening around me; I can read research.

2. A Mind to Think

I can critically examine data I find. What are the stats? How have health systems, countries and communities responded to COVID-19? What did they do well? What do I believe they could have done better?

3. Available Information

Lots of data about the coronavirus is available not merely to experts, but to the public. What information am I consuming? Only news from journalists, or do I read the data directly from the source?

If you are in college, you have access to Proquest. You can also use Google Scholar. Read the data with your own two eyes, and ask some questions:

-What is the credential of this researcher? Are they a doctor, nurse practitioner, epidemiologist?

-Do they in any way monetarily or politically benefit from the conclusion they have drawn? (We see this happening in major news sources regularly).

-Everyone has biases. What biases may this researcher have?

-What is the data saying? What is an appropriate response to the data?


How can I apply this to the coronavirus?

Begin with recognizing that you do not have to be an expert in the field of infectious disease or critical care to think about and study COVID-19.

1. I can use my eyes to see -- What am I observing? What is happening around me? I can use my eyes to look at data.

2. I can use my mind to think -- Have I attempted to critically examine what is going on around me? What are the stats? How have health systems, countries and communities responded? What did they do well? What could have been done differently?

3. I can examine available information -- COVID data is not a hallmark preserved only for epidemiologists and intensivists; there is a lot of information available to the public. What information am I consuming? Where are these sources from? Be wary of drawing conclusions solely on reports from journalists who only share their personal interpretation of the data, rather than putting the data itself before your own eyes.

Dear Christian, this is especially for you; do not forget that we are not promised a disease-free, comfortable life as believers. Remember that we live in a world that delights in lies. Are you actively using your own mind to study, try cultural trends, and cling to Biblical truth? Do not be easily tricked into the manipulation of information, fear-mongering, and peer-pressing happening each and every day through these current events. By God's grace, I will not be conformed to this world, but transformed by the renewing of my mind (Rom. 12:10).

I encourage you not to be one of the people who embraces a lofty, nasty attitude. I've seen so much of this; we will vary on our conclusions on what was done well and what went way wrong in response to COVID, but we know that God has called us to walk in love and humility toward one another.

"Put on then, as God's chosen ones, holy and beloved, compassionate hearts, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience, bearing with one another and, if one has a complaint against another, forgiving each other; as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive. And above all these put on love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony. And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in one body. And be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teaching and admonishing one another in all wisdom, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, with thankfulness in your hearts to God. And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the father through Him" (Colossians 3:12-17).

Resolve not to cave to hateful assumptions, hushed gossip, or unnecessary arguing. Use your mind for God's glory, refuse to be conformed merely for the sake of acceptance, and dare to think! Don't look back on the post-shut-down days and see that you weren't purposeful. Make intentional choices about what media you consume and create. Do not numb your mind for the sake of pleasing those around you; rise above that temptation.

"For you are children of light, children of the day. We are not of the night or of the darkness. So then let us not sleep, as others do, but let us keep awake and be sober. For those who sleep, sleep at night, and those who get drunk, are drunk at night. But since we belong to the day, let us be sober, having put on the breastplate of faith and love, and for a helmet the hope of salvation. For God has not destined us for wrath, but to obtain salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ [...] Test everything; hold fast to what is good. Abstain from every form of evil" (1 Thessalonians 5:5:-9, 21-22).

Live for Christ indefinitely! Nothing matters more in this life than to know Jesus; our godless society may mock our nonconformity to the simplistic conclusions of this world, but at the end of the day, I will give report to God--not my peers--for the life I have lived (Matt. 12:33-37, Rom. 14:10-12). 

As previously stated, I am not arguing that all Christians will conclude in the same manner about the pandemic. With the wonderful way God has created so many unique minds, I'm certain different individuals will raise distinct concerns, ideas, and interpretations of the data. But how much better it is, by His grace, to use the minds He has given us for His glory, seeking to discern these troubled times rather than to bow our heads and mindlessly accept whatever voice in our culture currently screams the loudest. I will not live that way; perhaps more than any other time in history, we have so much information and data before us, waiting to be sorted through and discerned by a mind in which Christ is exalted as the greatest thinker of all time. 

God is all wise, and as we cry out to Him for help to make sense of how to best live for His glory in a mightily ungodly culture, He will guide us. Drench your heart in His word. Love Scripture more than all the data, all the books, and all the research; ultimately, there is no higher authority on anything than the Author of our existence. No one better grasps infectious disease processes, the economic ramifications of the shutdown, prevention of viruses, or living in a polarized society. God is not absent through these odd times; He is with us; He knows all the answers. As we are baffled by our own lack of knowledge, we find comfort for our souls in knowing the Omniscient One who is never taken aback by any tumultuous event our world ever faces. 

In summary, jump in! Discern, think, study, and read for yourself on the topic of COVID-19, but don't stake your hope on the things you learn or conclusions you draw. Primarily look to Christ, remembering we are only temporarily dwelling on this earth and will someday go home where our true citizenship lies: in heaven. If all the data told me I have a 110% chance of dying of the coronavirus today, in no way has my hope been taken away, for my soul is in the hands of the One who created the world and intimately knows every microorganism at such a level of comprehension that is untouchable to even the greatest scientists of the world.

Rise up, my friend. Think well, and love Christ most of all.

Twenty Lessons from Twenty Years

Thursday, August 13, 2020


Today begins a new year of life! 365 days have snuck by right under my nose; from late nights caring for sick patients with awesome coworkers, to studying hard for seemingly endless college assignments, this year has been full. As I look back on these past two decades of living, I am so grateful that through every chapter of joy, pain, newness, brokenness, sorrow and sweetness, Jesus has been completely faithful. Especially in the last few years, I find praying through the day is not only a delight, but such a necessity. When another six page essay is due for a humanities class....when there are two thousand photos to be edited...when pro-choice protesters are having panic moments and calling me #allthenames...when a patient is beyond the hope of recovery....in all these moments He has faithfully attended to my prayer. He is able in the moments that seem impossible to us. We don't always see the outcomes we desire, but we have a faithful Savior who has never once failed us, and that is where our hope comes from; not from life going just perfectly at every turn, but in the constancy of my never-changing Savior.

Here are twenty things I've taken away from the last twenty years!

1. Speaking the truth will get you in trouble; it may feel like you're blazing a trail alone, but when we hold to the truth as Scripture has defined it, there is not one moment we walk alone. He is always present and He will sustain us as we seek to share His truth in a world that delights in lies.

2. You will get hate when you choose to speak up for the cause of the unborn, but when I consider the far worse fate the unborn child faces when he or she is aborted, I feel that my own concerns with how much hate I get can be so selfish. Do I care about what it feels like to be dismembered? Do I care about what it's like to have potassium chloride injected into their myocardium (muscle of the heart)? When pondering their pain, the hate I sometimes face is such a small trial considering that I have been given the privilege of being born and not killed in the womb. Thus, I will always keep speaking up. The unborn are worth the challenges of pro-life activism. 

3. The medicine my heart needs when it is broken cannot be prescribed by this world. I need the truth of Scripture that reminds me to cling to the One who is my Rock and my Salvation. After experiencing depression, all I can say is that the world's solutions are so utterly empty, and my need for Christ in every season--seasons of pain, joy, challenge or beauty--is so very great. He is the One who mends broken souls and ministers to the hurting. If we seek Him through the times of trauma and depression, He will draw near to us, even when things feel dark.

4. I can attempt to be a critical thinker and try to discern well, but if I do not go to His word as the highest and greatest authority on all things, I can be certain my judgment will fall short. 

5. So very many friends have proven not to be friends over the years. I can respond to their attitude by being unforgiving and bitter, or by His grace, I can forgive. When cliquey-ness, gossip and slander are more popular than kindness, Jesus is willing to help me rise above and keep showing love even when it hurts my heart. Christ is the friend that still died on the cross for our sin even as we spat in His face and disdained Him. Our God is a friend to us like no other; this is what gives us hope and drives us to keep reaching out after others have been cruel.

6. Sometimes the exact things I say I'll never do is exactly what God may be leading me to do in my life. "I'll never work in health care." "I'll never go to college." Well, younger Cassidy, yes you will.


7. There is abundant purpose in the mundane. From completing another algebraic graphing problem to helping a nurse with a bed change, it can all be done from a heart of worship, if I will intentionally praise Him in the midst of my day-to-day living.

8. God does not give up on me amid my immense need for greater growth. I've always been a perfectionist, and I've come to see that I can have a very worldly view of perfection. Jesus is the only perfect One, and amidst His complete wholeness, He never gives up on the work of His hands, though we are so utterly lacking. My hope is not in my own measure of having it together; I know in my sin that I have nothing to offer my holy God, and yet He loves and pursues me. My hope lies in my perfect God, not in my own success or failure. (Rom. 3:23-26, Ps. 138:7-8, 1 Cor. 1:4-9, 2 Cor. 3:5, Eph. 2:1-10).

9. Sometimes my plans will completely fall apart. Hopes will be dashed sometimes. Life is not always ideal. But God's eternal purpose for me will be achieved, not by my obsessive chasing of goals, but through surrender and trusting the One whose ways are always higher than mine.

10. Community has value; a Biblical theology of community begins with understanding that my desire for friendship first and foremost exists to be satisfied in God. I become a needy friend when I expect people to do for me what only the Savior can. Jesus is the One upon whom I cast all my cares (Ps. 55:22). Jesus is the One who is ever and always with me, wherever I am. When I walk closely with the Savior, I am freed to be a selfless friend who pursues community in a God-glorifying way.

11. Every day is full of necessary to-dos. Do I care enough about my relationship with Christ to prioritize time in the Word and in prayer even when I may be tired from endless homework and night shift living?

12. I care about the theology of the sermons I listen to and the books I read. Do I care about what theology the music I listen to is teaching me? Am I being encouraged to worship myself: "I'm soooo worthy"? Or am I listening to and singing words that exalt my God: "He alone is worthy"?

13. Some fields of health care promote putting your heart in a casket, burying it, and never expressing true compassion to your patients again, but God calls us to share His love. It is not my sweet patients that measure my care for others; it is the difficult, fit-throwing, name-calling, overreacting ones that God uses to reveal if I truly love others selflessly. In the moments of dealing with challenging patients, compassion is still necessary. Compassion may come with calling security or even the police if needed, but nonetheless, I am resolved to intentionally show care to my patients and not self-preserve. 

14. The local body of Christ matters so much. When I first started working night shift, I only went to church if I had Saturday and Sunday night off. Soon I realized if I continued this pattern, I might only make it to church once a month. So with a cup of coffee (or 4) in hand, I began attending almost every Sunday. God used this greatly to grow my walk with Him; even when feeling physically exhausted, I was spiritually strengthened.

15. I serve a God for whom nothing is impossible. When I am willing to pray for the things that may seem impossible from my perspective, sometimes I will get to see God work in ways I couldn't have imagined. It's this belief in God's ability that has led us as sidewalk counselors to pray for women in very challenging circumstances not to end their baby's life through abortion. Several babies have been saved when we refused to give up and kept on praying.


16. No matter what level of growth God brings you to, always maintain an approachable demeanor. To be able to know the God of the universe is so amazing; sometimes as we grow closer to Him, there can be a temptation to act prideful towards those who are not prioritizing their walk with Christ. Remember it was God's kindness that led you to repentance; may we be vessels of His gentleness and humility. Be willing to speak convicting words, but speak that truth in love. (Rom. 2:1-11, Eph. 4:1-25).

17. I do not have to understand God's plan for my life in its entirety. Sometimes I don't know why things are broken, don't go as planned or why certain hopes are never realized, but when my heart aches with uncertainty, I can be anchored to true hope. God never guarantees my dreams will come true, but He promises to be faithful, good, and ever with us. (2 Tim. 2:11-13, Ps. 119:68, Matt. 28:20). 

18. Singleness is such a gift; after briefly being in a relationship then breaking up, I saw in a new way how much God uses this season to allow me to have greater freedom to serve Him with all my heart. Anything He leads me to, by His grace, I can up and do. A drive down the street in the middle of the night to talk to a post-abortive girl who is having an anxiety attack...Heading out of state to assist with girl's ministry for a week...Getting more involved in my unit at work... If I was blessed with a family, I might not be able to do all these things, so for however long this season lasts, I want to keep "up and serving" the One who set my heart to beat.

19. Pain is an excellent teacher; though it's not something we'd prefer to go through in life, pain refines us and helps us put what most matters into perspective. As I look back over the past few years, I am so thankful God saw fit in His sovereignty to allow my heart to break--over situations with friends, family, school, sidewalk counseling, etc. It felt like too much to bear at that time, but in the moments we feel so insufficient to take on one more burden, our hearts find hope in clinging to our strong Savior, who alone gives us the endurance we need to face the trials at hand.

20. Every book of the Bible must matter to the Christian. Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus and Numbers are included; sometimes Christians prioritize reading the New Testament and the book of Psalms, but fail to read the books they may feel are harder to get through. But we know: "Every word of God proves true; He is a Shield to those who take refuge in Him" (Proverbs 30:5). 

....Thanks for sticking with me through these endless random thoughts! In short, life is ever bursting with moments that are sweet, exciting, mundane, painful and sanctifying, but through each hour, Jesus is on the throne. This is where my hope lies now, and for all the rest of the decades of my life (or however long the Lord keeps me here). So we may rejoice, not because life is simply delightful at every moment, but because through each year, we have a greater hope than anything this world can give or take away from us: the Gospel! 

Twenty-one years of living, nine years of walking with Jesus, and so much ahead... No matter what further twists and turns may be sovereignly purposed for my life story, I will have all that I need because Christ is ever present and faithful. 

He who keeps you will not slumber // Psalm 121:3b

Finding Perspective and Refreshment for Our Souls During Unrest

Saturday, June 20, 2020


Well, it's June now! We have officially survived the Coronavirus shutdown and the civil unrest occurring in our nation. Even now that we are free to do more than simply grocery shop, there is still a sense of weariness and exhaustion that seems to settle over many of us in our day-to-day living. I was at work one day, caring for a patient, when the TV in their room suddenly reported tragic, forlorn news; story after story, the media was telling me how horrible the Coronavirus is out there. And certainly it has devastated many families, individuals, countries and economies. But the media has a way of taking the tragedies that happen all over and bring them all to you; creating a strong opportunity for information overload.

Suddenly, we feel the temptation to panic. What will we do about the virus being so communicable? Is there going to be a second wave? How about this civil unrest? How long will mobs and riots continue?

There is a great blessing about being able to access so much information at the tip of our fingers, but with it can come additional opportunities to cave to fear.

Have you been feeling that at all, in your own life? Do you feel more prone to panic? Have you felt chronically exhausted, not sure when you'll ever feel refreshed again?

Here are four questions to ask when you're endlessly weary:

1. Where I am I turning for refreshment?

The age-old saying: "You are what you eat" has some truth to it. What has your mental consumption looked like lately? What are you reading? What apps do you use repeatedly? What shows are you watching? What podcasts are you listening to? Are you setting things before your eyes that lift your heart to the Savior or that cause you to question where He is? Are you taking things to heart that are Biblical?

This culture is post-modern in a number of ways, one being that there is not a belief in hope amidst uncertainty unless we can make a scientific proof for that hope (such as hand hygiene, for example, to give us hope of preventing the transmission of COVID). I'm all for taking safe measures to prevent pandemics. I'm not all for depending on the seen and the felt. I cannot see God, but He is the One I look to for hope. Rest for my soul is not found in hand sanitizer and keeping six feet away from those around me. This is a good practice for preventing the Coronavirus that we should continue for the time being, but it is not where I place my ultimate hope.

When my heart is weary, I do not look to the CDC, WHO and news channels to tell me if I should cling to a shred of hope or not. Even when the worst has come to worst--as we thought might occur at the beginning of the COVID outbreak--my heart does not have to be overwhelmed.

God knew altogether, before the foundation of the world, that we would face the challenges that have presented before us. 

So even while I continue to do my best to keep my hands washed to prevent COVID transmission, I will not look to this world to tell me if I have permission to hope or not. I have a hope that cannot die: Jesus Christ!

Just as it has been true in every other season, now, in the midst of so many challenges, our hope is in the Gospel. Our God is the One who transforms broken souls, brings redemption through the impossible, and revives people from spiritual deadness.

"For me to live is Christ, and to die is gain [...] Only let your manner of life be worthy of the Gospel of Christ" (Philippians 1:21, 27a).

While we are beginning to return to normal life as much as possible, may our hearts first and foremost seek God. May we not get caught up in the hype, anger, and confusion around us, but may we set an example as the people of hope that we are. Because of the sacrifice of Christ's life, we no longer look to the events of this world to keep us optimistic or cause us to fall forlornly to the floor. No, our Savior is the One to whom we look.

While Paul was imprisioned, he wrote to Timothy:

"For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. Therefore do not be ashamed of the testimony of our Lord, nor of me His prisoner, but share with me in the sufferings for the Gospel according to the power of God, who has saved us and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works, but according to His own purpose and grace which was given to us in Christ Jesus before time began, but has now been revealed by the appearing of our Savior Jesus Christ, who has abolished death and brought life and immortality to light through the Gospel, to which I was appointed a preacher, an apostle, and a teacher of the Gentiles. For this reason I also suffer these things; nevertheless I am not ashamed, for I know whom I have believed and am persuaded that He is able to keep what I have committed to Him until that day" (2 Timothy 1:7-12, emphasis added).

My future hope lies not in this life. So when current events spiral out of control, by and through God's grace, I will be anchored to true hope. I am being cared for and watched over by the God who created the immune system, upholds the universe by His powerful hand, paints the backs of ladybugs and directs each person's life story. He is intricate, He is intentional, and He is incredibly present through the uncertainties before us.

We have this ever-living encouragement for our souls:

"So when God desired to show more convincingly to the heirs of the promise the unchangeable character of His purpose, He guaranteed it with an oath, so that by two unchangeable truths, in which it is impossible for God to lie, we who have fled for refuge might have strong encouragement to hold fast to the hope set before us. We have this as a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope that enters into the inner place behind the curtain, where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf, having become a high priest forever after the order of Melchizedek" (Hebrews 6:17-20, emph. added).


2. Have I prayed about it?

When your heart is weighed down, where is the first place you go? To a friend? To post about it on Twitter? To the scientific studies, as an attempt to disprove your worries?

Scripture tells us where to go when this life feels like too much: "Cast all your anxiety on Him because He cares for you" (1 Peter 5:7, NIV). 

We are not meant to be self-reliant, but to be utterly dependent upon our mighty God, so don't be terribly surprised when the events of this world remind you how much you're insufficient to handle it all alone. You weren't created to deal with it alone; we are in desperate need of our Savior. "Blessed be the Lord, who daily bears us up; God is our salvation. Our God is a God of salvation, and to God, the Lord, belongs deliverances from death" (Psalm 68:19-20).

If something has bothered you enough to worry you, it's definitely time to pray about it. Are you concerned about catching COVID and going on a ventilator? Are you worried about the future of our nation? Are you uncertain about the economy? Then lift it up.

I'd recommend not just praying in passing as you drive or work (though it is great to pray as you perform your daily tasks); make an intentional effort to set your full attention on pouring out your heart before God. We know that as we cast our cares upon Him, He will sustain us; we will not be moved because God is our strength (Ps. 55:22).

Allow these troubled times to cast you more fully upon the Savior. "O you who hear prayer, to you shall all flesh come" (Psalm 65:2).

3. Am I making an effort to serve others?

It's easy to stay in our own little world when risks of illness and unrest are all around us, but what does it look like, in this season, to serve others?

Focusing on your own needs, problems, and challenges is certain to multiply the sense of stress, fear and uncertainty within. Ask yourself a few questions: what are those around me facing? Who can I serve, and what would be an appropriate way to serve them while we attempt to prevent further sickness? Can I write someone a letter? Can I pick up the phone and call a loved one? Can I meet a financial need?

It's convicting how many times I evaluate my own life--especially when I'm feeling anxious--and quickly see how much time I've spent thinking about me, and how little care I tend to truly invest in others. This is a propensity many of us have, and it will not die without intentionality.

"For you were called to freedom, brothers. Only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another. For the whole law is fulfilled in one word: 'You shall love your neighbor as yourself'" (Galatians 5:13-14). 

You will have to make a purposeful decision to look into the needs of others, even while you may feel that your needs have not yet been met. Jesus delights in this kind of faith: "Jesus looked up and saw the rich putting their gifts into the offering box, and He saw a poor widow put in two small copper coins. And He said, 'Truly I tell you, this poor widow has put in more than all of them, for they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on'" (Luke 21:1-4).


4. Have I been in the Word? 

In times of highest joy and lowest grief, we need the Word of God. Whether the world seems sweet or sorrowful, our hearts must be steeped in the truth of Scripture, for there we find the guidance, refreshment, perspective and conviction our hearts so deeply need.

If you were to compare the amount of time you spend on social media, news and TV with how much time you spend in the word, which is your greatest investment? We can easily say we love the Word, but what are our lives truly declaring? Have we prioritized pursuing Christ above our daily tasks? If not, don't be shocked when an entire day has come and gone and you haven't read even one verse. Our day-to-day tasks still exist and must be accomplished, and we make sure those get done, but how strongly do we prioritize being in God's Word? Do we hold out and keep reading even when it's challenging, seemingly dry or does not make sense? Or do we quickly give in to distraction and speed-read a favorite passage instead?

Slow down. Open your Bible, and ask God to use it to transform you. Even if you don't yet see any growth or change in your own life, or haven't experienced any specific moments of inspiration in your reading, God is still working. The Bible is not a book like any other:

"For the Word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of the soul and of spirit, of joints and marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart" (Hebrews 4:12). "Forever, O Lord, your Word is firmly fixed in the heavens" (Psalm 119:89).

You cannot expect to deeply know the Savior to whom you belong if you are not in His Word. Don't first and foremost go to the Facebook page of Christian leaders, looking for an opportunity to refresh your soul and grow in Christ; run to Scripture. "The unfolding of your Word gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple" (Ps. 119:130). It's not the same to read a book about the Bible or a Christian devotional with a few Bible verses in it. You need the real thing, for yourself, with your own two eyes.

What has to change in your life and schedule so you end up in His Word every day?


There are still uncertainties in our world. There are still questions we have not yet answered, but we know where to run with our pains, anxieties, and concerns. By God's grace, may we be people with a faith that endures challenges and grows stronger when difficulties multiply. What if we looked back at 2020 thirty years from now and saw it as a time we turned to God, looked to His Word in all things, and brought every overwhelming situation before His throne? What a testimony that could be of God's endless faithfulness to sustain us! This painful season does not have to be wasted if we will utilize it intentionally for His glory. Pour out your heart before Him and trust His ways as higher than ours. He has not left us, but gives us so many opportunities to know Him more in these post-shutdown days.

One Life Well Lived: Reflections on My Grandma

Friday, June 12, 2020


I shared these words for my grandma's funeral. She was such an amazing person that I believe her example can be an inspiration not only to my close family members who will hear this shared today, but to anyone seeking to live their life for the Lamb that was slain. So I share these words with you.

There are so many wonderful things that could be said of my grandma. From the beginning, she was a loving, present, faithful and Christ-like influence in my life.

My very first memory of grandma is of a day she had come over to our house to babysit my siblings and I. I must have been around preschool age; at the time I was known for being strong-willed and a tad fiery. I could get away with being naughty around some babysitters, but not grandma. You see, I think grandma and I had that feisty nature in common, so she knew all the tricks I'd try to pull. 

That particular morning, I had earned myself a timeout, and grandma told me: "Cassidy, you stay put in that chair; every time you get up, you will have one minute added to your timeout." Of course, she couldn't be serious, I reasoned. So I got out of my chair about ten times, and by the time I had finally learned my lesson, I had enjoyed thirty minutes in the beloved timeout chair. This might have been overdoing it for some children, but for me, it was exactly what I needed to see that, yes, I actually did have to obey. Grandma was not afraid of her passionate grandchild, and I knew it. I was quite a difficult one to tame, but grandma never gave up on investing in my life and reminding me why it is important to do what is right.

Knowing exactly what to say about grandma is such a challenge, because there were seventy-seven beautiful years, each one with special memories. I had the privilege of knowing her for twenty of those years, and during that time, I saw grandma in moments of highest joy, and valleys of lowest pain. 

Grandma was never one to sulk; she was very determined, and utilized her loving and strong-willed nature to touch others' lives. Though she might have felt most comfortable in her own little bubble--wrapped up in a blanket, reading a book on the couch--she had a wonderful ability to reach out to others. Grandma had this unique gift about her; she could sense when someone was new or did not feel welcome, and she would make her way over to that person, seek them out, and intentionally get to know them. This was true to the very end. After grandma had passed away in the hospital, the physician assistant came in to pronounce her death, and told me, "Only hours before her stroke [after which she became unresponsive], she was joking with me and making me laugh." 

Even amid her own pain and suffering with chronic pain and other health conditions, she was extremely purposeful. She thanked her nurses. She made sure to talk with the medical staff and get to know them.

Another strength clearly seen in grandma was her extreme resilience and endurance. She would never have described herself in that way, but every time something seemed to push her down, it wasn't long until she had sprung back up, ready to face a new day with abundant hopes and plans. 

Grandma had several heartbreaking things occur in her life; the most notable being when grandpa passed away of a sudden heart attack. I never met grandpa, but whenever I asked her about him, she would always say, "He was the most wonderful husband in the world." She had truly lost the love of her life, and I don't think I'll ever fully grasp how hard that must have been for her. Terms like depression always seemed foreign to grandma, because, somehow, she always stayed afloat through the pain. She had a strong faith that did not hinge on life going well from her perspective. She was devoted to "follow the Lamb whithersoever He goeth" (Revelation 14:4).

She was devoted to "follow the Lamb whithersoever He goeth" (Revelation 14:4).

And she meant this commitment to Christ! At one time in her life, she prepared for missions in Africa, believing God might have been leading her there. Instead, God lead her to serve in Canada for a time. But her sheer willingness to cross the ocean and enter into the unknown resounded from the surrender that dwelt deep inside her soul. Her life was not her own; she had been bought with a price. And she sought to glorify God throughout all her life.

Grandma was especially purposeful about pouring into those around her. Sometimes, if my siblings or I were really in a lot of trouble, we would be dropped off to grandma's house for several days. This was a place of certain heart-resets. Grandma was not worried about pleasing us every moment, though she was extremely loving; she was willing to have hard conversations with us kids and ask heart wrenching questions that dove to the depths of why we found ourselves in trouble. She had strong insight and always knew how to create a convicting conversation with us on why change was necessary. Don't get yourself in trouble with grandma, but if you do, she'll be certain to love you into a place of life-change.

Grandma was a soul of kindness. Her resolute thoughtfulness could be seen regularly, but especially when a holiday would roll around, only to find that she had been stitching away at a lovely quilt or handmade ornament just for the recipient. She cared about gifting and creating in a way that made a legacy; I see now in many of these beautiful gifts that there was not only the intentionality of a visionary mind, but the touch of kindness that lives on. She loved her family so well, and wanted us to know it. She was always there for us, even allowing me to live with her for several months when my family divided. She was often deep in thought, and had a glorious laugh that I long to hear again.

Her thoughtful example will not be forgotten. Her devotion to Christ will continue to inspire me. Her example of loving others as Jesus has will always remind me why I should break out of my own little world and invest into the lives of others.

I believe this poem by C.T. Studd reflects well on the life she lived:

Two little lines I heard one day,
Traveling along life's busy way;
Bringing conviction to my heart,
And from my mind would not depart;
Only one life, 'twill soon be past,
Only what's done for Christ will last.

Only one life, yes only one,
Soon will its fleeting hours be done;
Then, in 'that day' my Lord to meet,
And stand before His judgement seat;
Only one life, 'twill soon be past,
Only what's done for Christ will last.

Only one life, the still small voice,
Gently pleads for a better choice
Bidding  me selfish aims to leave,
And to God's holy will to cleave;
Only one life, 'twill soon be past,
Only what's done for Christ will last.

Only one life, a few brief years,
Each with its burdens, hopes and fears;
Each with its clays I must fulfill,
Living for self or in His will;
Only one life, 'twill soon be past,
Only what's done for Christ will last.

When this bright world would tempt me sore, 
When Satan would a victory score;
When self would seek to have its way,
Then help me Lord with joy to say;
Only one life, 'twill soon be past,
Only what's done for Christ will last.

Give me Father, a purpose deep,
In joy or sorrow Thy word to keep; 
Faithful and true what e'er the strife,
Pleasing Thee in my daily life;
Only one life, 'twill soon be past,
Only what's done for Christ will last.

Oh let my love with fervor burn,
And from the world now let me turn;
Living for Thee, and Thee alone,
Bringing Thee pleasures on Thy throne;
Only one life, 'twill soon be past,
Only what's done for Christ will last.

Only one life, yet only one,
Now let me say, "Thy will be done";
And when at last I'll hear the call
I know I'll say "twas worth it all";
Only one life, 'twill soon be past,
Only what's done for Christ will last.

Only one life, t'will soon be past,
Only what's done for Christ will last. 
And when I'm dying, how happy I'll be,
If the lamp of my life has been burned out for Thee.

Grandma, you were always too humble to admit it, but your were truly a remarkable soul. I am so glad you are now in the presence of God eternally, face to face. There is no more pain where you are. And though we have tears here, deeply saddened over your departure, our faith in the same Savior gives us great hope of standing before the throne with you someday, singing together, "Worthy is the Lamb that was slain."

Revelation 4:11 says: "You are worthy, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for you created all things; by Your will they exist, and came to be." Grandma, God created you; by His will you existed and came to be. And how you lived your one life well for your Maker. 

May we be encouraged by your example to do the same.

Clinging to Gospel Hope through Exam Week Stress

Tuesday, April 28, 2020


I took a seat and opened my laptop, feeling a sense of trepidation growing by the moment. Too much homework, not enough time. Two tests, two exams, an essay to write and two chapters to read, but I was stuck on one assignment that wasn't making sense. So much for my ideals of accomplishing it all quickly. Now I had to slow down, call the math tutor, and figure out what on earth I was missing.

During the moments things went as I hoped, it was easy to entrust my life, moment by moment, to the faithful God who created me. When the end of the semester rolled around, I found myself freshly faced with a temptation to cave to fear, anxiety and restlessness. God graciously allowed my sense of stress to reveal a need for further growth in my faith. Did I trust that God is good, in control , and knows exactly how to write my life story? Or was I quick to assume everything was going to utterly fall apart if I didn't take hold of the reins and hustle like mad?

Certainly, I must give my best if I expect good results in school, but there's a difference between a diligent heart that trusts God's hand over it all, and an attitude of fear that acts solely on an impending sense of doom.

I was living out the latter rather intensely that day.

My soul couldn't manage to find rest until I stopped and poured out my heart before God. "Cast your cares on the Lord and He will sustain you; He will never let the righteous be shaken" (Psalm 55:22). God desires for my difficulties to draw me closer to Him; when we go through challenging seasons--in school or something else--He graciously presents the opportunity either for us to look inward or upward. Our situations of stress don't force us to become lacking in character, rather they reveal where our hope truly lies and who we actually are deep down.

I long for my moments of testing, stress, and challenge to reveal a heart that puts its utmost trust in God. That doesn't mean life always goes just beautifully and as planned, but that on both the bright and dreary days, I have placed my hope in the One who never changes.

"So when God desired to show more convincingly to the heirs of the promise the unchangeable character of His purpose, He guaranteed it with an oath, so that by two unchangeable things, in which it is impossible for God to lie, we who have fled for refuge might have strong encouragement to hold fast to the hope set before us. We have this as a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope that enters into the inner place behind the curtain, where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf, having become a high priest after the order of Melchizedek" (Hebrews 6:17-20).

...here are five ideas for cultivating a Christ-centered exam week!



1. Begin each day with God

Whether you find yourself easily accomplishing your to-dos, or struggling behind in the day, one of the best ways to keep your focus on God throughout it all is to begin each morning in the Word. Maybe you're like me and hate being overly rigid in your day-to-day scheduling. If that's the case, it may be hard to discipline yourself to start your day with a set aside time for pursuing Christ. But even those with a spontaneous sense about life need the vital refreshment of time with God. If He's worthy of our entire lives, He's certainly worthy of being pursued each day too.

Consider working through a Bible reading plan and reserving time for prayer as you awaken the morning. Though a thousand tasks await us as we prepare for finals, we can turn to the right place for strength, guidance and hope as we begin.

"Your Word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path" (Psalm 119:105).

2. Cast your cares upon Him through the uncertainties

God doesn't desire for us to wait until we have it together to come before Him; it's in our brokenness and challenges that we come to know Him more intimately. When you feel overwhelmed, cast that care upon God. When you failed that test you really needed to pass, cast that pain upon Him. When you feel unmotivated to do the next thing, weary from months of study, cast your exhaustion upon Him.

Scripture tells us Jesus is the Wonderful Counselor (Is. 9:6); not only does God listen to us when we lift up our hearts before Him, it's His nature. He is the most loving, caring, kind and wise advisor and counselor we could ask for. His love for us is steadfast (Ps. 52:1b), He hears our prayer (Ps. 65:2), and He will never abandon us (Deut. 31:6).

"For the eyes of the Lord are on the righteous, and His ears are open to their prayer. But the face of the Lord is against those who do evil" (1 Peter 3:12).

3. Pray through it

It's easy to go through the motions and just get assignments down, one after the next; but what if each bit of homework was the avenue of turning to God in prayer? We are used to searching out solutions to our problems: emailing the teacher, asking a classmate for input, having a friend proofread your paper, etc. and there's nothing wrong with any of those things, but what could it look like to turn to God in the moment of need? More than just asking God to help us with our own trials, though, are we praying for our professors, classmates, and those who attend our school to turn to Christ?

Charles Spurgeon brings some interesting perspective to why prayer is so vital in the moments it may feel impractical: "Not to pray because you do not feel fit to pray is like saying, 'I will not take medicine because I am too ill.'" When your exam has you too stressed? Pray. When you can't memorize one more medical term? Pray. Keep up this practice until it's your default response to bring your requests before God.

"The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective" (James 5:16b).



4. Memorize passages of Scripture that help you resist anxiety

Do you feel more prone to panic during exams? Scripture isn't just for reading, but is also to be used for fighting back against temptation. You've probably heard it said that Scripture tells us not to fear over 365 times--we could use a different verse each day to guard our hearts against fear. Thankfully, exams don't occur 365 days a year, but when we prepare our hearts to resist anxiety in school, we can take this freedom, by God's grace, into other areas of life where we may also be tempted to fear.

Scripture tells us:

"Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus" (Phil. 4:6-7). 

Choosing prayer over fear does not mean our problems in life aren't hard, they certainly are; but in our weakness, Christ is strong (2 Co. 12:9), and that is where our hope lies. From one question to the next, examining our knowledge from the semester, our tests provide the chance to cling to truth and reject fear.

"So we can confidently say, 'The Lord is my helper; I will not fear; what can man do to me?" (Hebrews 13:6).

5. Give thanks in the midst

When I'm head deep in algebraic graphing, the last thing I'd naturally want to do is give thanks! Perhaps if I could incinerate my math book and never have to take another course like it, I'd be compelled to rejoice. But when I'm in over my head in a subject I don't love? I tend to complain. Have you been there too, with mental lists of everything wrong with your class, what you don't like, and all the things you wish you could change? Such a class provides the perfect opportunity to praise God. The Lord doesn't want me to wait until I'm in my desired circumstances to give Him thanks, but right in the midst of everything that feels trying, I have so much to praise Him for! "Give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God's will for you in Christ Jesus" (1 Thess. 5:18).

Instead of vaguely mumbling a little "thank you" here and there, think of what you can specifically praise God for. What is the most challenging part of your exam prep? Give thanks to God for how He's growing you through that. What assignments have taught you something interesting this semester? Express your gratitude to Him for providing that chance to learn. Have you met new friends or faculty who blessed your life? Praise God for those He has placed around you.

"I will give thanks to you, O Lord, with all my heart; I will tell of all your wonderful deeds" (Psalm 9:1).